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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
happened in katrina. nbc's katy tur is with us from the hard hit jersey shore tonight. katy, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. that is certainly the big question, up and down the new jersey shore, the aftereffects of sandy are still being felt. we're on long beach island. it's a barrier island, it's literally where the atlantic ocean meets the bay. and here, dozens of homes still look like this, their bottom floors completely washed away when the powerful storm surge came through. the last time kyle burns house looked like this was 1950, the year it was built. >> bed, couches, chairs, everything was just floating around. it was a mess. >> reporter: two feet of rushing water and sand soaked this third generation family beach home. with gas lines restored, the people of colgate on lbi are finally allowed to come back. >> they're old. '78. >> reporter: as residents count their personal losses, state officials are looking at the big numbers. >> when you look at the damage done because of the density of new york, the number of people affected, the number of properties affected wa
to be thrown out. and since you're going to hear the memory of katrina invoked more and more in the coming days, like katrina, three days out, we're still learning about places receiving very little help and attention, like staten island. ann curry has more. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you, that is right, the outrage boiled over here in staten island, because more than three days after the hurricane here, people from the close-knit community accused them of responding much slower here than to the richer parts of the city. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> reporter: staten island has had enough. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help, immediately. >> reporter: residents here are asking why hasn't more help arrived? >> i think we're not getting more attention, because we are a working class neighborhood. and it is kind of like fend for yourself kind of thing. >> reporter: on the streets hit with debris, where the death toll has gone up to at least 19, today, the fury was seen live on television. >> but you need to come here a
of other disasters, from hurricane katrina, to joplin, now think of this. the people in all three of those places are reaching out to help those suffering in those regions tonight. tonight, their story from janet shamlian. >> reporter: hundreds of miles from the despair, everything from diapers to batteries, collected from the people of louisiana, meant for people in new jersey. >> we know what they're suffering in new jersey, we just wanted to do something to help. >> reporter: the effort started simply, at first, just messages of support. like these from hurricane katrina survivors, images that quickly went viral, then, more help. >> some of the first people we saw down here were firefighters from new york, the new york police department and folks from new jersey. everybody came down here and helped us, it is time to help everybody back. >> reporter: there is a similar feeling from joplin, missouri, which was devastated by the tornado. even people living in the fema trailers, the community wanted to help. >> it brought back a lot of memories. >> reporter: lisa dunn and her family lost th
is that there are pockets that are very similar to some of the hardest-hit areas after katrina. >> reporter: the company plans to help rebuild seaside heights, still closed off to residents. back in staten island, patrice says she doesn't know what's next, but she does know what she needs. >> i need some place to stay permanently. that i can afford to pay once fema help ends. >> reporter: and this is a community-based center run by volunteers. also fema has set up 55 centers throughout the hardest-hit areas of staten island. >> michelle frandsen, thank you. >>> meanwhile, the red cross says it's received $117 million in donations to help victims of sandy. and tells us that so far its response has been near flawless. but that's not what we heard in some hard-hit areas of new york city where storm victims claim the country's preeminent disaster relief organization has been missing in action. here's nbc's senior investigative correspondent lisa myers. >> reporter: two weeks after sandy hit, residents of breezy point, new york, still wonder if more help will ever arrive. >> we haven't seen red cross at all.
. >> this is our katrina. >> reporter: in new jersey and new york more than 4,000 residents are staying in shelters. nearly a quarter of a million people are still without power nearly two weeks after the storm hit. on long island, protests and anger that the utility company lipa hasn't worked quickly enough. >> we are cold, tired and we want our power now. >> reporter: today the agency says power has been restored to 93% of long island. meanwhile new york joined new jersey ordering gas rationing rules to help reduce long lines and frustration at the pump. this as hundreds of volunteers fanned out across neighborhoods including staten island to bring relief. part of new york city's designated volunteer day to help the thousands still dealing with sandy's destruction and showing the victims that they are not alone. >> thank you for helping. i appreciate it. >> reporter: homeland security secretary janet napolitano is scheduled to be back tomorrow. this time to visit a disaster recovery site in staten island. meantime, residents here are still waiting for the power to come on. governor chris christie
, they're struggling with the question many in new orleans dealt with after katrina. should they go back home and rebuild at all? sayreville is at the intersection there and has been flooded over and over. nbc chief correspondent anne thompson has more on some residents who have had enough. webber avenue, they do a strange thing. taking away debris, but not the heartache of a neighborhood in ruins orange stickers declare 230 homes uninhabitable. including this one. >> it is like a death, a dead body, i have to look at it like we swam for our life. >> reporter: for the third time in three years, she and her neighbors deal with flood damage, the 2010 nor'easter, hurricane irene and then sandy. >> we didn't buy these houses saying oh, you know, it is a flood zone, who cares? i researched the house, they didn't flood in 13 years, the research at the time showed the flood insurance affordable. >> reporter: they rebuilt two times. >> we came back in to rebuild. because it was our home. >> reporter: this time the numbers don't add up. >> it doesn't make economic sense to put more money into the
all of katrina across the entire gulf region. and this got a lot of people's attention this weekend when it appeared in the new york times, the picture of the statue of liberty kind of what-if question a look at what the climate change and coastlines up and down the east coast will look like. our report from our chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. >> reporter: these are the images few ever expected to see. the train stations in new jersey hit by water from superstorm sandy. yet scientists say this type of destruction could become far more frequent because of the heat-trapping greenhouse gases warming the planet. >> we could see by the end of the century, storms as high as sandy, as much as once every 15 years or more often, because storms surges will start from a higher sea level. >> reporter: how high? a recent study suggests we are in line for a five-foot sea level rise, given all the fossil fuels we have already burned. look at the projections for the gulf of mexico, that risk puts new orleans up five feet, spreading 25 feet along the coast, the ocean swallo
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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